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Signs Your Association Won’t Be Around in 8 Years

Posted By David Ewald, Monday, August 11, 2014
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The great advisor to CEOs, Marshall Goldsmith, wrote a book, What Got You Here, Won't Get You There. I have paraphrased that, saying often to my staff: "If we were doing business today the way we were eight years ago, we'd be out of business. And, if we are doing business eight years from now the way we are today, we will be out of business."  Every organization need to change, adapt and improve — associations are no exception. Organizations that fail to do so may not be entirely gone in eight years, but they will be well on the path to irrelevance.

Here are five signs that your association won’t be around in eight years:

  1. Failure by leaders to keep pace with technology (often blaming it on their age or budget).

    I'm amazed when well-paid people who have been in their careers for years admit, "I'm bad at technology". Take a class. Read a book. Hire someone. When the leaders give up on technology, so does everyone else. Problems with technology are one of the greatest morale busters in any organization.

  2. Failure to recognize that the world has changed.

    Unless we stay abreast of current trends and push our own organizations to be faster, better, smarter they will fall behind. The assumption that an organization can continue to do things the way it always has is a losing proposition and one guaranteed to fail. Other organizations are working hard to change, and improve. If you don't pay attention, you just don't realize it.

  3. Failure to confront recurring problems and solve them.

    Time and again, organizations find themselves dealing with the same problems: people, technology, product quality, systems, service quality. They talk about the problems with no resolution while often having their attention lured away by a new, "bright shiny object" — much to the frustration of their staff.

  4. Failure to invest in staff.

    Staffing is usually the largest budget item in an association. Not investing in finding great employees, then training and working hard to motivate them, is like trying to drive an IndyCar on wagon wheels. Those who are content with a weak staff are content with a weak organization. Find the best people you can, then give them what they need to do a good job, and do what you can to reward and retain them.

  5. Failure to harness the power of volunteers while directing the energy in a consistent direction.

    Like a fast-flowing river, volunteers provide the energy for an organization. Unchecked, that energy can overflow the banks and overwhelm operations. Unmotivated, the streambed dries up and the power goes away. Engage your volunteers.  Let them share in the joy of moving an organization forward.

Associations with their finger on the pulse of their members, our economy and world at large thrive and grow well. Those that do nothing more than stay the same quickly go the way of the buggy whip manufacturer. I'm planning on my business being here in eight years – how about you?

Tags:  association management  associations  business  david ewald  ewald consulting  success 

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