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Analytic Trends in Associations Part I: General Trends

Posted By Mei Li Brown, Thursday, August 8, 2019
Updated: Tuesday, August 6, 2019

Analytics can be confusing, but they don’t have to be. As we learned in our previous post, “How associations can use analytics to boost membership,” web analytics are vital to associations when it comes to retention and recruitment. Once you are utilizing your analytics to help retain and grow your membership, the next step is to determine if your association’s site is performing well.

According to Neil Patel, measuring the success of your webpage’s analytics will vary due to several factors including your business type, industry, and audience. To get this data, you need to consistently monitor your analytics to set your sites baseline averages and then work from there.

We conducted our own case study on association websites to help us measure association analytics. We pulled analytics from a sample of 42 associations from July 2017to August 2018 to gain insights into what the baselines were and gain perspective on trends. Here is what we discovered:  


association analytic trends


Users vs. New Users
We discovered that, most web visitors are new to the website and have lower engagement than returning visitors. It is important to keep in mind that a new visitor is counted as someone who accesses your site from a new browser or device. Visitors will also be counted new again if they clear their cache and cookies. While determining if a visitor really is “new” is not completely accurate, this data indicated that associations needed to focus on being more welcoming to non-members on the site instead of only advertising to members or people familiar with the association.

Sessions & Pageviews
The case study showed that most web visitors will only visit once or twice, but they engage in multiple pages per single session. Considering most web visitors are new, the session to visitor ratio was not surprising and roughly correlated with a ratio of 1:1. Pageviews, however, demonstrated that the average visitor engaged with the site since they are visiting multiple pages per session. This was a great data point and an indicator of drive on the websites.  

Avg. Session Duration & Avg. Time on Page
Throughout the study, we found that web visitors who stayed on the site have terrific time durations of engagement. For average durations and times on page, we recommend aiming for least 1 minute, 30 seconds per session and 30 seconds per single page. These time stamps created a nice baseline that indicated some sort of interaction occurred.

Bounce Rate
A hard truth was confirmed by the study, associations tend to have higher bounce rates.
In the Brafton 2017 Content Marketing Benchmark Report, they calculated the average bounce rate across sites to be 58.18%. In their data sample, they found that B2B had higher bounces than B2C. Our study calculated that the sample websites were averaging a bounce rate of 55.12% –very similar to the findings of Brafton.

So why do association sites have higher bounces? In general, these sites are loaded with multiple calls to action (CTAs) meaning they require the web visitor to have a strong actionable item (e.g. Read our Blog, Register Here, Join Today). Not many associations are selling products outside their events and membership, unlike most B2C websites, so visitors will either decide to engage with what that they see or leave if it’s not what they’re looking for in the current moment, thus creating a bounce.

What does this all mean?
Don’t let all of the options and metrics overwhelm you so nothing is measured. Start with a few analytics, understand the implications and expand into deeper data after starting with key metrics.

One of the first places a potential member will look for information is on the website, so it is critical the website layout & content is reviewed and updated on a consistent basis.

Remember less is more! You don’t have to take away the feeling of exclusivity of your members. There are ways to make both groups feel catered to, including consistently refreshing your content to be relevant and simplifying the user experience. A confusing website will discourage people from exploring the site and can turn off potential and existing members if the messaging is not clear. We encourage you to utilize the baseline data from our case study to analyze your association’s website performance and discover where you can make improvements for your visitors.

TAGS: Analytics, Associations, Content Marketing, Marketing Strategy, Case Study

Tags:  Analytics  Associations  Case Study  Content Marketing  Marketing Strategy 

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Using Technology and Creativity to Drive Association Marketing Strategies

Posted By Kathie Pugaczewski, CAE, CMP, CRP, QAS, Thursday, August 1, 2019
Updated: Wednesday, July 31, 2019

Associations have a long history dating back to the 1800s. They are the original communities and influencers for professions long before social media became prevalent. This marks my 30th year in association management and I currently am the Vice President of Marketing Communications & Technology for Ewald Consulting.

When I started my career with the Builders Association of Minnesota in 1989, our technology tools were a fax, typewriter, pagers, lots of file cabinets for paper registrations and membership applications and a DOS database with the blinking bright orange text on a small screen, big box computer. No email, no website, no cell phone, no Microsoft Office – they hadn’t been created for the mass market yet. We launched the association’s first-ever website in 1996.

In 2005 when I joined Ewald Consulting, my first major initiative was to find us a new database and migrate our clients to Affiniscape 24/7. After researching limited options, we chose a custom database built in Microsoft Access. Every Friday, I would export the client data into 24/7 so they could have searchable directories and see their data online. A few years later, Affiniscape launched its M360 platform which integrated the website with a database providing a dynamic experience for our members.

A few years later, Affiniscape was bought by YourMembership (YM) and we proceeded to transition our clients from Affiniscape to YM. A few years later, Community Brands bought YM and several other platforms to have a suite of offerings for associations. Which summarizes the current platform environment of technology platforms – thousands of options plus mergers and acquisitions is now the norm.

The marketing technology landscape is one of my favorite graphics that demonstrates the extensive proliferation of tools over the past 8 years. In 2011, there were 150 platforms. As of April 2019, there were 7040. There are plenty of tools to choose from now. So unlike the 1990s, options, access and affordability are no longer barriers to entry for associations.

Choosing a limited set of tools, learning how to implement them creatively and executing value are critical for associations to remain relevant. We are at a critical junction of technology and human behavior that will create our future depending on how we strategically implement our choices effectively with simplicity and clarity key for our customers.

With a plethora of platforms to choose from, our Marketing Communications Team is focusing on executing relevant and measurable marketing strategies for our associations. Key strategies include:

  1. Building out a content marketing strategy for the long haul. Content marketing is a marathon, not a sprint. It takes time to build awareness, generate interest from new audiences and expand our base. Our volunteers are our Subject Matter Experts (SME) for content for our conferences, blogs, social media and have a wealth of insights that are core to building our community. Generating content with context and driving conversations will keep the association vibrant and the go-to resource for professions. Going beyond conference and membership promotion is critical to drive the value proposition of being a part of the association.
  2. Reviewing the business models and clearly delineating the value proposition of being a member and buying offerings from our associations;
  3. Conducting website audits to ensure clarity, clean and creative design and coding for mobile responsiveness and effective Search Engine Optimization;
  4. Creating strong landing pages for our home pages, membership and conference pages to  have a strong and clear Call to Action, concise benefits, bullet points for scanning, original photography and call out buttons to prompt action;
  5. Implementing marketing automation to build awareness and convert prospects to customers and ensure a clear customer journey;
  6. Using an event mobile app platform for our clients’ conferences. With the technology development of Progressive Web Apps (PWA), we are looking at developing year-round mobile apps for our clients in the next year to connect our  members year round.

Other initiatives we are working on include business intelligence, data collection and analysis and the implications of AI (Artificial Intelligence) for our clients. We are excited about the tremendous opportunities that nonprofit organizations now have access to and to implement best-of-class strategies to ensure their success.

We are excited to be implementing our own content marketing strategy based on our research and experience with our clients. Please email me if you have any questions at kathiep@ewald.com.

Kathie Pugaczewski is the Vice President of Marketing Communications and Technology. She has more than 30 years of association management experience with a focus on technology platform strategy, marketing communications, conference management, continuing education and certification programs. She joined Ewald Consulting in 2005. Previously, Kathie worked for the Midwest Association of Association Executives (MSAE) as Marketing Director and the Builders Association of Minnesota as Executive Vice President. She has a Bachelor's degree in journalism from the University of Minnesota and completed the Institute for Organization Management at the University of Notre Dame. In 2003, she earned her CAE designation. In 2009, she earned her Certified Meeting Planner (CMP) designation. In 2019, she earned her Certified Recognition Professional (CRP) designation and her Qualified Association Specialist (QAS) designation.

Tags:  association management  associations  content marketing  marketing  marketing strategy  marketing technology  technology  value proposition 

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Don’t get left behind! Four content trends for associations to stay relevant

Posted By Rebecca Wegscheid, Thursday, July 25, 2019
Updated: Thursday, July 18, 2019

The world of marketing moves fast.

The industry is constantly progressing, and nothing is exempt. Standards, processes, and especially trends may change at any time. In order for organizations to survive, they need to be dynamic, quick, and up-to-date on relevant trends because if they are not able to adapt, they will get left behind.

The same applies for associations, with one key difference; they don’t necessarily require the newest, best, or flashiest tools and technology. As a result, some are far removed from the newest marketing methods and trends.

Associations often ask when faced with marketing challenges becomes, “How can we be a resourceful organization and stay relevant in the fast-changing marketing industry?” The answer is easier than one may think. To stay on top of relevant marketing trends, associations can adopt basic, necessary tools and techniques to deliver meaning and value to members.

To help get you started, here are three of the top content marketing trends associations should consider to keep up in the fast-changing industry.

  1. Writing
  2. Written content is a mainstay in the marketing industry. Even though how writing is consumed has changed over time, for example newspapers vs listicles, writing itself is timeless and serves as a foundation for other content including white papers, long form blog posts, advertisements and webinars. As associations think about the future, it is important that they have a strong, reliable writing base developed as a foundation for that content.

  3. Video
  4. Every day, 5 billion videos are watched on YouTube and 45% of people watch more than an hour of Facebook or YouTube videos a week. Viewers are 95% more likely to remember a call to action after watching a video, compared to 10% when reading it in text form. Video is clearly a form of content that people consistently consume and remember. By producing video associations can increase brand awareness, social reach and engage with a huge number of users. When producing videos, they should be optimized for the platform they will “live” on and their use. For example, videos promoting a certification session should be high-quality and have professional production to guarantee quality sound and graphics whereas videos promoting a social event can be more “approachable” and filmed with a cellphone. Whatever the use of the video, the content should include subtitles and not just for accessibility. At least 85% of videos on Facebook are watched without sound, make sure to include this overlay text in all of your video content.

  5. Live content
  6. At the end of the day, associations are resources that focus on promoting events and conferences. Whether it’s live tweeting or recording a live Instagram video, live content provides value to members, association and builds event awareness, and also gives the association future content for professional videos, webinars, and more. With the popularity of social media, live content provides too many benefits and opportunities to not capitalize on it.

Staying up to date with content trends should be a fun way to consistently deliver meaningful content to members. While the industry will always shift, adopting basic trends is an easy way to provide value to your members. Go ahead, adopt the trends, and unleash the new possibilities for your association.

Tags:  associations  marketing  marketing strategy  marketing trends  social media 

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How associations can use analytics to boost membership

Posted By Mei Li Brown, Thursday, July 18, 2019
Updated: Wednesday, July 17, 2019

What are analytics?


Analytics are a brilliant tool used to research possible trends that any industry can benefit from using, especially associations. Looking at analytics is all about seeing what is working and what isn’t, and then making improvements.


Associations often have one thing on their mind: increasing membership. How to increase membership, how to provide the best experience and value for members, etc. They want to grow their membership, but analytics as a tool are often overlooked or ignored.




While it may be daunting, analytics can help guide your organization and grow membership. Here are four uses of analytics that can help associations grow their membership.

  1. Auditing
  2. Having a good overall experience with an organization is like a puzzle: many pieces fit together to create the full picture, and a positive online experience is one of them. Associations need to maintain a strong web presence in order to provide a positive online experience as well as gain and retain members. By using analytics, associations can audit their websites and see what is working and what isn’t, such as 404 errors and bounce rates, and then make improvements to provide a better experience for current or potential members.

  3. Monitoring social accounts
  4. Everyone is active on social media these days, including businesses. Social platforms are versatile and an important part of any marketing strategy because of their ability to drive awareness, engagement, and start conversations. Analytics allow associations to start and monitor the online conversation of their brand and gain a deeper understanding of which social campaigns are effective. This understanding can then be applied to create a better experience for prospects and members by targeting content that specifically fits their needs and the online conversation.

  5. Paid Marketing
  6. If an association invests in paid marketing, they want to make sure the campaign is effective. Whether it is A/B testing or promotional content, analytics are a useful tool for evaluating paid marketing because they allow associations to compare options. By choosing the most successful option, associations provide content in the right context for their members.

  7. SEO
  8. So why does auditing, social media, and paid marketing matter? It contributes to improving Search Engine Optimization, often referred to as SEO. At the end of the day, associations strive to enhance the user experience. Search engine bot crawlers read a websites’ pages from top to bottom and rank the site based on the quality fundamental SEO practices executed. Examples include meta tag, fresh content, and alt tags. Bots will determine how high or low a site will appear on the Search Engine Results Page (SERP), which affects the visibility of a site in a search engine.

The use of analytics has transformed the world of marketing, bringing endless growth opportunities to organizations. Utilizing analytics in your strategy and planning can be key to keeping your organization relevant and thriving. So the next time analytics comes up in a strategy meeting, don’t shy away, instead dive right in and help grow your organization.

Tags:  Analytics  Associations  Marketing Strategy  Marketing Tools  Membership  Membership Growth 

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5 Must-Do Content Marketing Strategies for Associations Creating Awareness, Driving Value Proposition

Posted By Rebecca Wegscheid, Thursday, July 11, 2019
Developing effective marketing strategies that drive measurable results can be tricky. It requires analysis, critical thinking and clear Calls to Action (CTA). This is vitally important for associations in an ever-increasing and competitive marketplace.

 

Associations often focus their marketing efforts on conference and event promotion without establishing the organization as the thought-leader in the profession. Before marketing events, webinars and conferences, we need to communicate the Value Proposition of the association to establish credibility and broaden our base and grow our community.

 

While for-profits have much big budgets and financial resources, content marketing can still be effectively executed for non-profits. And associations have a unique advantage when it comes to content marketing – Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) in the membership who can share their expertise and drive collaboration, conversation and community.

  

One of the biggest challenge’s associations face today is answering key value questions, like “Why should I join?” or “How will this association benefit me today?” As a large portion of our association base of members are nearing retirement which underscores the need to gain early and mid-career member base to remain relevant.

One key marketing strategy that organizations are effectively using is content marketing which can take many forms. With access to SMEs, associations can utilize this strategy to drive membership value and drive engagement. A content marketing strategy will be unique to each organization or association, but they share the same foundation.

 

5 Must-Do Content Marketing Strategies:

  1. Fill in the “gaps”
    Before marketing conferences and product, provide context by creating awareness of the organization with relevant content through the website, webinars and highlighting the expertise of conference presenters. This will prevent a knowledge gaps and drive conversions. Associations provide value to members and stakeholders by being the “go-to resource” through sharing industry articles, writing blogs, developing newsletters, and sparking conversations on discussion boards and choosing speakers who are presenting on the most important relevant topics.

  2. Meet members where they are
    It’s important to keep in mind that not all audiences are active on the same platforms. In order to provide useful, meaningful content and a valuable experience for members, associations must use platforms that are relevant to the audience and adopt a multi-faceted content approach by utilizing different mediums such as social, email, and direct mail.

  3. Be adaptable and flexible Change is constant for our audiences. By listening and adapting to member needs, associations can provide value, creating a better experience that is appropriate for the audience.

  4. Cater to the audience – personalize!
    A crucial part of providing value is understanding who the members are and tailoring to their specific needs. Use a style, language, tone, and even content that is familiar, meaningful, and relevant to them. By giving the audience exactly what they need, associations can show the members their value.

  5. Be consistent
    Consistency is key in content marketing. When content is scheduled and shared frequently, associations can start to build a following. Not only that, but they also gain trust and are seen as a reliable source of information. By consistently posting content, associations both build brand authority and provide value to the audience by sharing useful and meaningful resources.

Through all five of the rules, there is a common theme: a focus on the members, both current and prospective. In order to provide the best, meaningful experience to the audience, associations can adopt this holistic approach to membership. So it is time to refocus and watch your association grow for the better.

 

Tags:  Association Growth  Associations  Content Marketing  Marketing Strategy  Membership 

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The Value in being the last one to leave - GUEST POST

Posted By Gene Sullivan, President of CAI-MN, Tuesday, September 8, 2015
Updated: Thursday, September 3, 2015

As a kid growing up, I remember hating anytime we went out somewhere as a family.  It didn’t matter if it was coffee hour after church, a wedding, a picnic, or the grocery store, we always seemed to be the last ones to leave.

The reason for this was because you could always find my father striking up a conversation with someone he had never met before, and he was always interested in finding out who that person was, what they did for a living, or their views on a sundry of issues and matters.

Consequently, it seemed that people, and I mean everyone loved talking with my father.  At any gathering, he was a very popular man, and always in the center of any gathering.

Watching him as I did growing up, I came to realize the reason behind his popularity, my father had a genuine love of learning, and the sincere belief that he could always learn something from everyone.  That is what I think the satirist Will Rogers meant when he said “I never met a man I didn’t like!” 

That statement is the key to understanding and getting the value of this organization - CAI.

And what a rich resource it is!

From the articles written in our bi-monthly magazine Minnesota Community Living, to our Tradeshow.  From our educational events, to our social gatherings; there is always an opportunity to be a little sharper, a little more knowledgeable, a little more of an expert at the end of any gathering from the time you first walked in.

But the key is to never stop loving to learn. 

Next time you are at a CAI gathering, make it a point to meet someone you have never met before, and take some time to find out what they do, what they know, what is important to them.

That is what networking is really all about.  It is not going through and handing out your cards quickly to everyone and leaving, but trying to find something out you never know before.

The knowledge, the real life experiences of the members in this organization is amazing.  There is a lot we can learn from one another, because once again, in the words of Will Rogers “Everyone is ignorant, only on different subjects!”

Tags:  associations  board member  networking 

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Summer at Ewald: A reflection and farewell

Posted By Mattie Roesler, Intern at Ewald Consulting, Monday, August 31, 2015

When I started my internship with Ewald Consulting Group back in June, I had no idea what to expect. I would soon discover that at Ewald I had the freedom to develop my own summer learning experience, because the management team at Ewald encouraged the interns to take advantage of any opportunity we could. If we wanted to sit in on a sales presentation? No problem.  Develop a new social media campaign involving the company’s pet fish? Go for it. The more innovative the idea, the more excited our employers would be. I quickly learned that at Ewald, I was not just an intern, on call for coffee runs, shredding files, or moving boxes. I was a member of the Ewald Consulting team, where my ideas and time were just as valuable as the other employees. At risk of sounding like a love letter to all of my employers and coworkers, I simply wish to say thank you for giving me an environment to excel in I also wanted to share some of my favorite lessons and experiences.

1.       Ask and you shall receive

This is the biggest lesson I learned at Ewald. It took a little while for me to understand how to get the most out of my job here. Another intern, Erik Hillesheim, can take a lot of credit for this. He taught me to be assertive with my aspirations at the company by getting involved. At his urging, I asked if I could sit in on a Government Relations team meeting early in the summer. Without that meeting, where I discussed some of my potential career interests, I would not have been invited to the Special Legislative Session, nor would I have been asked to help with Google’s Anti-Sex Trafficking Conference where I met a large network of amazing people. This taught me a valuable lesson: people, especially employers, want you to have a great experience. However, they can’t help you if you are not assertive about your wishes. It will never hurt you to try. Thanks Erik.

 

2.       Business should never be too serious.

I think everyone at Ewald Consulting, especially my boss Paul Hanscom, lives by this motto. Whether it be cackling during a call-a-thon with the “funky fresh” sales-team, Yoga breaks in the Member Services department with Katie Wilkerson, or even just a meeting to plan membership outreach, people are always laughing. In business, laughter acts like oil- it keeps a business running smoothly.

 

3.       Learning isn’t always easy

As previously mentioned, business can be nothing but fun. Sometimes. Other times, I had to learn to roll up my sleeves and learn some hard lessons. Some days were full of database entry or angry members on the other end of a phone call. Sometimes I made mistakes in a document or forgot to send a report. This helped me to engrave Dave Ewald’s “Always Double-Check” policy into my mind forever. Learning is tough, because it is almost always preceded by a mistake. However, Ewald’s Marketing Director, Kate Madonna-Hindes, is the keeper of the Band-Aids for these moments. I heard her say more than once that the most you can do is own up to your mistake and keep on moving. Another sincere thank you goes to you, Kate.

 Along with these lessons, I will walk away from Ewald with an expanded network of business contacts, mentors, and above all else, friends. Thank you to everyone at this company who made this summer so rewarding. 

Tags:  association management  associations  internship 

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Understanding Association Culture From The Eyes of a Millennial

Posted By Erik Hillesheim, Tuesday, August 25, 2015

Having worked in the association industry for about six months now, I’ve had the opportunity to see the ins and outs of a variety of associations. One of the most unique parts of associations is their culture. I was struck by an Associations Now article by Joe Rominiecki that says,

“Associations have a unique relationship with organizational culture, as the organization is at once a collection of employees and a collection of members. Though they overlap, that’s two very different scopes, internal and external, in which a culture exists and, importantly, in which it can be influenced. For-profit organizations, on the other hand, likely don’t worry much about changing their customers’ culture (as long as it involves buying).”

Culture is a complex beast that associations have to master in order to stay relevant. While benefits may differ among associations and across industries, a few key components of culture stay consistent across the board. Here’s my take on where they stand and how they’ll need to adapt in order to cater themselves to younger generations.

 

Networking

          Now: Through a few annual conferences and golf outings, associations allow members to connect with one another. This aspect is a big part of sharing industry findings and best practices. Members can make meaningful and lasting connections through sessions, round tables, and double bogeys.

          Soon: As much as older generations think we can’t hold a conversation with anyone without using FaceTime or Skype, it’s simply not true. In an ultra-connected world, networking has taken on an integral role in who we are. Ensuring that annual conferences provide opportunities for small group conversations and that associations offer opportunities for small meet ups outside of large scale events will be a huge benefit going forward. Associations must also integrate networking opportunities with technology. Twitter chats, webinars, and opportunities to submit articles/opinions are all great ways to promote networking.

 

Camaraderie

          Now: Very rarely can you recruit and retain members without a certain level of trust involved. Trust comes through interactions and time, both things that associations need to nurture. By hosting conferences, committee meetings, lunch and learns, and dinners, associations are trying to boost meaningful interactions between members.

          Soon: By offering more ways for members to interact open-endedly and pushing leading them towards these avenues, people will trust each other more, co-creating value within the association. Associations are doing a decent job offering in person interactions, but they must also think to create more roads for their members to drive down without needing a map. One way to boost trust through interactions is to use social media. By posting meaningful and useful content, members will start dialogues and push each other to participate, challenging industry standards and helping each other out. Trust =Retention.

 

Continuing education

            Now: Many associations are offering various courses, virtual and in person, to help professionals retain a wealth of updated knowledge that they can apply to their profession. They have begun to dabble in the ways of Webinars and online courses, in addition to informational sessions at annual events. This is a great first step that only needs some minor additions.

          Soon: Associations are starting to adopt the correct platforms to cater to millennials, they just need to continue promoting these platforms in new ways. Making sure that they are easily accessible and promoted widely on the interwebs is essential to continuing education initiatives. Another important point to make is that younger generations are fascinated about thinking differently and in an innovative way. The cookie cutter continuing education session won’t cut it. Try to think horizontally in your industry. How could you create an interesting session or webinar that is related to something hot in a similar industry and apply it to your member’s day to day? Associations are just like any other business; they must innovate.

 

 

In order to capture millennials and ensure your association stays relevant you must constantly be looking on the horizon for new and exciting areas to explore. I’d love to hear how you’ve been able to adapt as an association to appeal to a wide variety of generations.

 

Sources:

Rominiecki, Joe. "Where Membership and Culture Meet." RSS 20. Associations Now, 07 Jan. 2015. Web. 13 Aug. 2015.

Tags:  associations  culture  millennials 

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The Top Five Infographics for Associations

Posted By Mattie Roesler, Monday, August 17, 2015

As an Association Management group, Ewald Consulting oversees and develops strategy for many of our clients. This means, we get access to some of the most relevant information FOR associations, provided BY other associations! We thought it would be exciting to share some of the helpful findings we’ve come across, and what better way to do it than through our favorite infographics? Special thanks to all the companies and websites that created them, cited below.

 A Day in the Life of a Small Staff Association

The many hats of Association employees

Sometimes it’s hard for members to understand the complications of running an association. This infographic lays out a perfect depiction of the challenges association employees conquer on a daily basis. And who doesn’t love these hats? (memberclicks.com)

What membership benefits do Millennials Value

What membership benefits do Millennials Value?

I’m sure you’re just as sick with this buzzword as we are, but in order for an association to stay relevant it must cater to millennials in addition to their current members. (www.exchanges.wiley.com)

Distanced Association vs. Engaged Association

Distanced Association vs. Engaged Association

Co-creating value within your association is a great way to keep members engaged and ensure your relevance. Nothing feels better than having your members come back year after year praising your association for the value it provides. This infographic does a great job sharing the difference between a distanced association and an engaged association. (Amanda Kaiser, www.smoothpath.net)



Non-Profit Association tax breakdown

Non-Profit Association tax breakdown

Still a little confused on what your finance department is working on? This infographic is a fun way to spice up the topic of non-profit company taxes!  (associationsNOW.com)

5 ways to use promotional products

5 ways to use promotional products

Though many associations have a system for promotional products, this infographic gives some innovative suggestions on the most effective ways to get a bang for your buck with  members and potential members! (www.4imprint.com)

Tags:  association management  associations  infographics 

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Fish and Wits - Winston's Words of Wisdom

Posted By Winston the Betta Fish, Thursday, July 16, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, July 14, 2015

In July of 2015 Winston, a descendant of the first ever AMC Fish, was born into the Ewald family. Winston’s blood line traces back many generations to the creation of associations. His wisdom was lost at some point during the 18th century until he was recently rediscovered in a small river in Thailand. He has come to us to share the best association insight that can be found on the web. Each week he shall select 3-5 articles that prove most useful to association professionals all around the world. Here is what Winston has to say about this week’s articles:

 

1. “Our first article this week comes from a white paper released in May of 2015. ‘Leading Engagement From The Outside In: Become an Indispensable Partner in Your Members’ Success’ is a must read for all association executives. It challenges typical engagement strategies focusing on what association executives value, not members. By turning engagement on its head, Caraveli and Engel are able to give associations new ways to think about engaging their members.” Read this whitepaper here

2. “Another great read this week was an Associations Now article about hiring leaders from within and outside of your organization. It seems as though every association grapples with this tough question. On one hand you have the person who knows the ins and outs of how the association runs and on the other you have a fresh set of eyes and a higher level of understanding of management. Has your association faced a similar dilemma? We’d love to hear about it” Read the article here

3. “Last but certainly not least was an article by Adrian Segar about we are all wasting time being perfect. He introduces the idea of “risky learning”, or ‘[trying] new things with the certainty that we will learn something different, perhaps something important that we would not have learned via a “safe” process, and [being] prepared for the possibility to “fail” in ways that teach us something new and fresh about our process.’ He gives a very interesting perspective that you can bring back to your association!” Check out the piece here

 

If you have any articles that you think Winston may not have seen feel free to email his assistant, Erik, at erikh@ewald.com. They’ll be sure to review your article and share it with the world!

Tags:  articles  association management  associations  marketing  Winston 

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KNOWLEDGE & RESOURCES

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A Successful Year Starts with a Solid Budget by Bill Monn
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9 Marketing Ideas for Your Organization by Kathie Pugaczewski
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A Holistic Approach to Membership Recruitment by Darrin Hubbard
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Three Ways to Stronger Volunteer Engagement by Paul Hanscom
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