Ewald in Practice
Blog Home All Blogs

Fish and Wits - Winston's Words of Wisdom

Posted By Winston the Betta Fish, Thursday, July 16, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, July 14, 2015

In July of 2015 Winston, a descendant of the first ever AMC Fish, was born into the Ewald family. Winston’s blood line traces back many generations to the creation of associations. His wisdom was lost at some point during the 18th century until he was recently rediscovered in a small river in Thailand. He has come to us to share the best association insight that can be found on the web. Each week he shall select 3-5 articles that prove most useful to association professionals all around the world. Here is what Winston has to say about this week’s articles:

 

1. “Our first article this week comes from a white paper released in May of 2015. ‘Leading Engagement From The Outside In: Become an Indispensable Partner in Your Members’ Success’ is a must read for all association executives. It challenges typical engagement strategies focusing on what association executives value, not members. By turning engagement on its head, Caraveli and Engel are able to give associations new ways to think about engaging their members.” Read this whitepaper here

2. “Another great read this week was an Associations Now article about hiring leaders from within and outside of your organization. It seems as though every association grapples with this tough question. On one hand you have the person who knows the ins and outs of how the association runs and on the other you have a fresh set of eyes and a higher level of understanding of management. Has your association faced a similar dilemma? We’d love to hear about it” Read the article here

3. “Last but certainly not least was an article by Adrian Segar about we are all wasting time being perfect. He introduces the idea of “risky learning”, or ‘[trying] new things with the certainty that we will learn something different, perhaps something important that we would not have learned via a “safe” process, and [being] prepared for the possibility to “fail” in ways that teach us something new and fresh about our process.’ He gives a very interesting perspective that you can bring back to your association!” Check out the piece here

 

If you have any articles that you think Winston may not have seen feel free to email his assistant, Erik, at erikh@ewald.com. They’ll be sure to review your article and share it with the world!

Tags:  articles  association management  associations  marketing  Winston 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

The Importance of Mentorship

Posted By Kate-Madonna Hindes, Tuesday, April 14, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, April 14, 2015


 

My whole life I’ve tried to look beyond athletes or individuals who choose to advance their career, illegally. The same applies to business executives who have committed fraud or personally benefited from unethical transactions. It’s hard to see how anyone who plays by the rules can succeed in such a cutthroat world. When trying to analyze areas in my professional life where I’ve found success, I was surprised when I found the key to success sitting in my own lap! Mentorship is the one true practice that will ensure success in your business.

 

The importance of mentorship between a superior and a new employee is often overlooked in the business world. Companies hire new employees expecting them to sit through a day of "(Insert Company Name Here) Crash Course” and hit the ground running the next day. It simply doesn’t work like that. A relationship between mentor and mentee can be one of the most successful ways to ensure an employee is performing to the best of their abilities throughout their transition into a role.

 

This relationship is not only very beneficial for the new employee, but also the business. The potential benefits of the mentor, mentee, and company are quite impressive. Here are just a few of the benefits.

 

Mentee

1.      Increased Knowledge- The more knowledge that can be shared about the company, the ins and outs of the position, and each individual’s preferences, the more effective the new employee will be in his or her position.

2.      Networking- The new employee should be given the chance to meet everyone in the office. Not only will introducing them to coworkers make them feel like they belong, it will also give them the perception of promotion, positively impacting their work ethic.

3.      Comfort- By creating a relationship that extends beyond the professional lives of a superior and a newbie, the newcomer will be willing to reach out for help in a lot of scenarios that he or she potentially wouldn’t in normal circumstances.

 

Mentor

4.      Becoming a Teacher 101- Although they most likely didn’t go to school to learn how to teach, every management role requires one to be a professor of their branch and industry. Having a mentorship will help you more effectively and efficiently train in mew employees.

5.      Breaking Bad Habits- Where would your company be if management held every single employee "best practice” that they learned 20 years ago dear to heart? By training in new employees with the shiny company policies, management will be more likely to review how they go about their daily work, tidying up some areas they’ve become more lax about.

 

Company

6.      Employee Retention- Employees like companies who invest in them. By instilling confidence in the new employee and showing that your company cares about their success, they are much more likely to remain part of your team.

7.      Comprehensive Training- While some new employee training programs claim to be intensive and all encompassing, no one week training crash course will be as effective as a training program that keeps checking in on itself week after week. This relationship will allow you to curve employee performance continually as they grow within the company.

8.      Motivated Employees- This relationship will allow the new employee to find a niche within the company and get them more excited about their role. This will create a vested interest in the company’s success. Sparking this enthusiasm will create an employee base that comes to work smiling instead of one that punches in grumbling about how full their plate it.  

 

There are many other benefits that are less tangible and often small enough to dive under the radar when thinking about the benefits of mentorship. Implementing a solid mentorship program within your business will ensure success for the mentee, mentor, and the company as a whole. 

 

 

This post was written by Erik Hillesheim, Research Associate at Ewald Consulting. Reach Erik at ErikH@ewald.com. 

 

 Attached Thumbnails:

Tags:  engaging millennials  marketing 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

The Biggest Thing I’ve Learned in Marketing

Posted By Sai Yang, Wednesday, March 11, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, March 10, 2015
Untitled Document

I’ve been working with Ewald Consulting for almost three months as a Digital Marketing Specialist. I’ve learned many lessons about marketing and content development. I feel very blessed with what I’ve already experienced and know there’s even more to come.

I’ve recently started writing down a lessoned learned each day. Sometimes they’re really small (like, sleep more) and sometimes they’re larger.

One important lesson I’m learning is:

keep it simple

I’m sure you’ve heard of the saying, “less is more.” When putting together content for social media such as Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn, you’ll want to make it simple. Consider what your audience needs and consider your purpose with every post.

I started noticing that there was more engagements and interactions, once I began putting fresh content on our social media. For example, if someone wrote a blog post for our website, I shared it on social media. I learned to add new, relevant content for social media- simply because it increased our engagement. And, believe it or not- simple was best. People enjoyed our posts about the team and internal workings of Ewald Consultant most!  

Remember:  When developing content for social media choose your words wisely. When you start to write a lot on a single post, you can lose your audience’s attention. Therefore, you’ll want to put the most important caption at the beginning and make it simple by giving less. I know, that’s one thing I learned!

Tags:  ewald consulting  keep it simple  lessons  marketing  sai yang 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Quick and Easy Marketing Moves to Boost Conference Attendance

Posted By Julie Cygan, Tuesday, September 2, 2014
Untitled Document

Conference season is upon us and organizations are in various stages of marketing their events to build awareness, solicit exhibitors and sponsors, and, most importantly, ensure strong attendance. Strong attendance is the most critical of these activities. People want to attend an event that is successful — and attendance is a very visual, quantifiable measure of success. They see the conference as an opportunity to network and exchange ideas… so more attendees means more opportunities to connect. Sponsors and exhibitors are primarily interested in maximizing their exposure to decision-makers in the field and the value they perceive through conference sponsor/exhibitor opportunities is directly related to event attendance. Additionally, media contacts and stakeholder groups the organization hopes to influence will be more inclined to give attention to the organization if they know that its conference is a strong industry forum.

The following five moves can help give your conference an extra attendance boost.

  1. Send a special invitation to members who have never attended a conference before. This can be particularly impactful if the letter comes from an organizational leader like the board president or someone who has a direct relationship with the member. Even if a member is not able to attend the event this year, you will still gain some insight into why, which could result in changes for future years.
  2. Reach out to all new members who have joined in the last year. Again, this can be an invitation from a volunteer leader. Many organizations have an “ambassador” assigned to orient new members for the first year, which provides a natural fit for this. New members likely are not aware of the full value that is available through the conference experience, so a personal outreach effort to discuss this could be just what is needed to pull in a few more member attendees. You can bet that when the first-year member receives his/her dues renewal s/he will remember this invitation.
  3. Engage members, fans, and followers through social media. Most organizations find that they have a whole group of professionals who are loosely affiliated through social media but have never been contacted directly by an individual of the organization to ask them to engage further. The conference is the perfect opportunity for these individuals to convert their online interest into in-person networking. Make an effort to connect one-on-one through social media with people who haven’t engaged through another forum; you may be surprised at the responsiveness.
  4. Cross-promote with companies and organizations that support your membership. Many sponsors and exhibitors overlook the very easy promotional value they can gain by simply contacting their current and potential customers to encourage them to attend the conference and visit them while they’re there.
  5. Offer an incentive to those who help build attendance. This can be as simple as recognizing event promoters online or at the conference. It can be as involved as providing financial credit toward membership dues, event registration, advertising, or even cash back. An incentive-based campaign that recognizes successful attendee recruitment can generate new attendees, new members, and grow the overall organization.

While each of these moves is intended to boost conference attendance, they have the added bonus of giving the organization an excuse to contact and be front-of-mind with members and/or important industry supporters. This outreach may result in collateral benefits to the organization such as increased member retention and engagement by members and supporters in other activities of the organization. The impact that can result from a few little extra marketing steps can be significant and make the conference attendee experience all the more enriching.

Tags:  attendance  conference  event planning  ewald consulting  julie cygan  marketing 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
KNOWLEDGE & RESOURCES

MANAGEMENT | View all Management articles
A Successful Year Starts with a Solid Budget by Bill Monn
Read full article

MARKETING | View all Marketing articles
9 Marketing Ideas for Your Organization by Kathie Pugaczewski
Read full article

MEMBERSHIP | View all Membership articles
A Holistic Approach to Membership Recruitment by Darrin Hubbard
Read full article

VOLUNTEERISM | View all Volunteerism articles
Three Ways to Stronger Volunteer Engagement by Paul Hanscom
Read full article

© 2018 Ewald Consulting | All rights reserved
1000 Westgate Drive, Suite 252 | St. Paul, MN 55114
p. (651) 290-6260 | f. (651) 290-2266

Membership Management Software Powered by YourMembership  ::  Legal