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Social Media Tips for Nonprofits

Posted By Ewald Consulting, Tuesday, June 16, 2020
Smartphone social media
Photo by Omkar Patyane from Pexels
Your organization was likely founded with the goal of creating a community for your members. Fostering a virtual space where your members can come together and communicate with you and each other is crucial to community building. Social media is also a cost-effective way to get the word out about your organization.

 

Buffer explains that the top social media platforms used by nonprofits are Facebook with 98% of nonprofits using the site, Twitter (70%), LinkedIn (55%) and YouTube (45%). If your organization is not already on these platforms, take some time and set up profiles on each. Some associations are also using Instagram or even TikTok to communicate with younger audiences. You do not necessarily have to start posting today, but start your presence. Here are a few ways you can grow your presence online.

  1. Encourage engagement
    According to a blog post on Sendible, each post should include a call to action—every post you create should invite the audience to do something. For example, if you are promoting a conference, rather than merely announcing “Our conference will be this July in Chicago,” include a link for the audience to click that directs back to your website’s conference page. Whether it is a link to click, a video to watch, or asking the audience to leave a comment, opening the door for interaction is a major component of a successful social media presence.

  2. Use the right hashtags
    Sendible also explains that hashtags act as a great, free way to market your organization. Do some research and discover what hashtags are used in your industry. If you find ways to incorporate these hashtags into your posts, your content will come up in native searches that use that hashtag. It is a great way to get exposed to those interested in the industry.

  3. Be responsive
    Buffer explains that you should respond to every person who reaches out to you on social media. This ideally should be done in 24 hours or less. You want to make sure you are seen as friendly and open to those who reach out. This helps you build community by fostering communication with members and others interested in your organization.

  4. Observe
    Mission Box emphasizes the importance of social listening. Social media is a wonderful tool to get your message out to the public and communicate with your members, but social listening helps you understand what is going on with your competitors and your industry and examine how your organization is being received. To do this, take some time to research competitors and comb through their social media. How often do they post, and what are their messages? How many likes are they getting on their posts? You should also search your organization’s name to look at mentions on these platforms. Social listening not only helps you better understand the nuances of social media, it also gives you insight into how your organization is being received.

  5. Schedule your content
    Plan your posts ahead of time and use tools (such as Hootsuite, Zoho or Sprout Social) that post the content for you at designated times. This is a great way to ensure that social media is updated without having to dedicate time to posting every single day. According to Sendible, this is something that many nonprofit marketers struggle with, so having that assistance will make consistent posting easier. Beyond the schedule, be sure to monitor your social media accounts regularly. Sharing and liking posts from your members, allied organizations and other industry thought leaders can magnify your reach. It’s also important to be aware of major news stories, and to be sensitive to situations when your tweet or post could be perceived as out of place with current events.

By using and consistently updating social media, you are building a community around your organization.

Tags:  marketing  social media  tips 

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Outreach Marketing Strategies: Human Connections

Posted By Ewald Consulting, Tuesday, June 9, 2020

We all know that marketing is important, but you can take it a step further with outreach marketing. According to GroupHigh’s blog, outreach marketing focuses on human-to-human connection to grow your organization. Partnering outreach strategy with traditional SEO and keyword research sets up your organization for success.

Here are a few strategies to achieve this more human form of marketing
    Whiteboard with markers
  1. Be transparent about your cause
    Building trust is a major benefit of the outreach strategy. Foster human connection by being clear about what you offer and how you are received. Nonprofit Hub explains that this is important because, as you are building relationships, you want to make your business intentions clear so that individuals or partner organizations do not end up feeling manipulated.

  2. Third-party recommendations
    The first point from the GroupHigh post is the importance of third-party recommendations. When you are shopping for a new car, you often do not just take the salesperson’s word on how great the car is; you read reviews from third-party sources who have nothing at stake. This same concept applies to outreach marketing. See if you can find a way to get your organization mentioned in a customer’s blog post or ask for a testimony to put on your website. Self-promotion is important, but make sure it is not just you talking about how great your organization is.

  3. Support organizations with similar values
    Reach out and connect with organizations with similar values and goals as your organization. Nonprofit Hub explains that you should carefully choose who you work with because you want to make sure they are working toward the same things as you. The article gives the example of caring for the environment. If your organization strives for conservation, make sure you are not working with organizations that have a bad track record on environmental issues. This shows potential and existing customers that you are firm in what your organization values and will not compromise on what you believe in.

  4. Keep in touch with your most active members
    GroupHigh explains that active customers/members can be among your best assets. Foster close relationships with these members and ask them for their input. Members will appreciate you asking for their ideas and you can gain some excellent insight into what you can provide to make your organization better. This is a great way to build trust and great relationships with your members which will help develop a positive reputation. A few examples: The Academy of Human Resource Development held a Facebook live event to gather feedback from its community. The Minnesota Pharmacists Association has offered Zoom listening sessions and Town Hall meetings to gather specific concerns. While surveys are useful in identifying issues and trends, live events can make it easier to ask follow-up questions and dig deeper.

  5. Tell your brand’s story
    CMS Wire explains that telling your brand’s story is a strategy that is more human than just SEO and topic research. Identify your organization’s values and mission if you have not done so already, then use that as a driving point in blog posts, social media, and other marketing.

Mix these strategies in with your traditional strategies to foster a closer connection with your members and grow your organization.

Tags:  marketing  Marketing Strategy 

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Essential Items in a Marketing Plan

Posted By Ewald Consulting, Thursday, April 9, 2020

Marketing plan graphicMarian Burk Wood, author of The Marketing Plan Handbook, defines marketing plans as “comprehensive documents that summarize marketplace knowledge and the strategies and steps to be taken in achieving the objectives set by marketing managers for a particular period.”
According to the Content Marketing Institute, it is important to remember that marketing plans are not editorial calendars or a to-do list full of marketing-related tasks. It should outline a clear strategy to achieve a goal.

Here are some key elements to consider adding to your association’s marketing plan (or reviewing with fresh eyes if your plan has been in place for a while):

  1. Your target customer
    According to Forbes, you should think through and research who your typical customers are. Come up with personas for your typical customers and even give them names. Think of these customers when you are making decisions. It is crucial to understand who would use your product or service in order to market to them. Consider current, lapsed and prospective members as you develop your segments.
  2. Positioning
    According to Inc., you should research your organization’s position in the market. This will help you get a feel for how customers view you compared to your competitors. Consider not just other associations that may vie for your members/customers, but for-profit companies that may provide educational offerings that compete with yours. When you pinpoint your current position in the market, set a goal for where you would like to be positioned in the future.
  3. A unique selling proposition
    Forbes also explains that a marketing plan should include a statement about why your organization is different from other similar ones. For example, Jimmy John’s uses their slogan “Freaky Fast” to show that they deliver faster than any of their competitors.
  4. Competitor analysis
    Take the time to research your competitors. Inc. explains that you should have a solid understanding of their market, pricing and how their services are different than yours. Including this in your plan will help you determine how you stand out and help you find ways to market those strengths.
  5. Marketing strategy
    Inc. suggests adding in the resources you have for marketing. Does this include comprehensive social media? Websites? Webinars? Conferences? Emails? How will these resources be utilized? And how often? Consider these items when creating your marketing plan.
  6. Conversion strategy
    Forbes explains that you should include how you take interested people and turn them into customers. Do you offer any free content to draw customers in? Do you advertise to people in a certain industry or profession? Lay out how you draw people into your organization.
  7. Budget
    Think through what you can spend on marketing and how the money will be spent. Inc. says this is a crucial element as you will be able to see your return on investment after the plan has been implemented.

The Content Marketing Institute stresses the importance of taking the time to create this plan:
“Many marketers and firms will claim they have the marketing plans in their head, or within the tribal knowledge of the organization. This is simply not good enough. Many firms will have several disparate pieces of a marketing plan spread throughout the organization (i.e., with the sales department, product managers, marketing department, executive leadership team, strategic business planners). But in order for marketing to be successful, your organization must create and own a proper marketing plan, first and foremost.”

Tags:  marketing  strategy 

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Using Technology and Creativity to Drive Association Marketing Strategies

Posted By Kathie Pugaczewski, CAE, CMP, CRP, QAS, Thursday, August 1, 2019
Updated: Wednesday, July 31, 2019

Associations have a long history dating back to the 1800s. They are the original communities and influencers for professions long before social media became prevalent. This marks my 30th year in association management and I currently am the Vice President of Marketing Communications & Technology for Ewald Consulting.

When I started my career with the Builders Association of Minnesota in 1989, our technology tools were a fax, typewriter, pagers, lots of file cabinets for paper registrations and membership applications and a DOS database with the blinking bright orange text on a small screen, big box computer. No email, no website, no cell phone, no Microsoft Office – they hadn’t been created for the mass market yet. We launched the association’s first-ever website in 1996.

In 2005 when I joined Ewald Consulting, my first major initiative was to find us a new database and migrate our clients to Affiniscape 24/7. After researching limited options, we chose a custom database built in Microsoft Access. Every Friday, I would export the client data into 24/7 so they could have searchable directories and see their data online. A few years later, Affiniscape launched its M360 platform which integrated the website with a database providing a dynamic experience for our members.

A few years later, Affiniscape was bought by YourMembership (YM) and we proceeded to transition our clients from Affiniscape to YM. A few years later, Community Brands bought YM and several other platforms to have a suite of offerings for associations. Which summarizes the current platform environment of technology platforms – thousands of options plus mergers and acquisitions is now the norm.

The marketing technology landscape is one of my favorite graphics that demonstrates the extensive proliferation of tools over the past 8 years. In 2011, there were 150 platforms. As of April 2019, there were 7040. There are plenty of tools to choose from now. So unlike the 1990s, options, access and affordability are no longer barriers to entry for associations.

Choosing a limited set of tools, learning how to implement them creatively and executing value are critical for associations to remain relevant. We are at a critical junction of technology and human behavior that will create our future depending on how we strategically implement our choices effectively with simplicity and clarity key for our customers.

With a plethora of platforms to choose from, our Marketing Communications Team is focusing on executing relevant and measurable marketing strategies for our associations. Key strategies include:

  1. Building out a content marketing strategy for the long haul. Content marketing is a marathon, not a sprint. It takes time to build awareness, generate interest from new audiences and expand our base. Our volunteers are our Subject Matter Experts (SME) for content for our conferences, blogs, social media and have a wealth of insights that are core to building our community. Generating content with context and driving conversations will keep the association vibrant and the go-to resource for professions. Going beyond conference and membership promotion is critical to drive the value proposition of being a part of the association.
  2. Reviewing the business models and clearly delineating the value proposition of being a member and buying offerings from our associations;
  3. Conducting website audits to ensure clarity, clean and creative design and coding for mobile responsiveness and effective Search Engine Optimization;
  4. Creating strong landing pages for our home pages, membership and conference pages to  have a strong and clear Call to Action, concise benefits, bullet points for scanning, original photography and call out buttons to prompt action;
  5. Implementing marketing automation to build awareness and convert prospects to customers and ensure a clear customer journey;
  6. Using an event mobile app platform for our clients’ conferences. With the technology development of Progressive Web Apps (PWA), we are looking at developing year-round mobile apps for our clients in the next year to connect our  members year round.

Other initiatives we are working on include business intelligence, data collection and analysis and the implications of AI (Artificial Intelligence) for our clients. We are excited about the tremendous opportunities that nonprofit organizations now have access to and to implement best-of-class strategies to ensure their success.

We are excited to be implementing our own content marketing strategy based on our research and experience with our clients. Please email me if you have any questions at kathiep@ewald.com.

Kathie Pugaczewski is the Vice President of Marketing Communications and Technology. She has more than 30 years of association management experience with a focus on technology platform strategy, marketing communications, conference management, continuing education and certification programs. She joined Ewald Consulting in 2005. Previously, Kathie worked for the Midwest Association of Association Executives (MSAE) as Marketing Director and the Builders Association of Minnesota as Executive Vice President. She has a Bachelor's degree in journalism from the University of Minnesota and completed the Institute for Organization Management at the University of Notre Dame. In 2003, she earned her CAE designation. In 2009, she earned her Certified Meeting Planner (CMP) designation. In 2019, she earned her Certified Recognition Professional (CRP) designation and her Qualified Association Specialist (QAS) designation.

Tags:  association management  associations  content marketing  marketing  marketing strategy  marketing technology  technology  value proposition 

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Don’t get left behind! Four content trends for associations to stay relevant

Posted By Ewald Consulting, Thursday, July 25, 2019
Updated: Thursday, July 18, 2019

The world of marketing moves fast.

The industry is constantly progressing, and nothing is exempt. Standards, processes, and especially trends may change at any time. In order for organizations to survive, they need to be dynamic, quick, and up-to-date on relevant trends because if they are not able to adapt, they will get left behind.

The same applies for associations, with one key difference; they don’t necessarily require the newest, best, or flashiest tools and technology. As a result, some are far removed from the newest marketing methods and trends.

Associations often ask when faced with marketing challenges becomes, “How can we be a resourceful organization and stay relevant in the fast-changing marketing industry?” The answer is easier than one may think. To stay on top of relevant marketing trends, associations can adopt basic, necessary tools and techniques to deliver meaning and value to members.

To help get you started, here are three of the top content marketing trends associations should consider to keep up in the fast-changing industry.

  1. Writing
  2. Written content is a mainstay in the marketing industry. Even though how writing is consumed has changed over time, for example newspapers vs listicles, writing itself is timeless and serves as a foundation for other content including white papers, long form blog posts, advertisements and webinars. As associations think about the future, it is important that they have a strong, reliable writing base developed as a foundation for that content.

  3. Video
  4. Every day, 5 billion videos are watched on YouTube and 45% of people watch more than an hour of Facebook or YouTube videos a week. Viewers are 95% more likely to remember a call to action after watching a video, compared to 10% when reading it in text form. Video is clearly a form of content that people consistently consume and remember. By producing video associations can increase brand awareness, social reach and engage with a huge number of users. When producing videos, they should be optimized for the platform they will “live” on and their use. For example, videos promoting a certification session should be high-quality and have professional production to guarantee quality sound and graphics whereas videos promoting a social event can be more “approachable” and filmed with a cellphone. Whatever the use of the video, the content should include subtitles and not just for accessibility. At least 85% of videos on Facebook are watched without sound, make sure to include this overlay text in all of your video content.

  5. Live content
  6. At the end of the day, associations are resources that focus on promoting events and conferences. Whether it’s live tweeting or recording a live Instagram video, live content provides value to members, association and builds event awareness, and also gives the association future content for professional videos, webinars, and more. With the popularity of social media, live content provides too many benefits and opportunities to not capitalize on it.

Staying up to date with content trends should be a fun way to consistently deliver meaningful content to members. While the industry will always shift, adopting basic trends is an easy way to provide value to your members. Go ahead, adopt the trends, and unleash the new possibilities for your association.

Tags:  associations  marketing  marketing strategy  marketing trends  social media 

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Fish and Wits - Winston's Words of Wisdom

Posted By Winston the Betta Fish, Thursday, July 16, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, July 14, 2015

In July of 2015 Winston, a descendant of the first ever AMC Fish, was born into the Ewald family. Winston’s blood line traces back many generations to the creation of associations. His wisdom was lost at some point during the 18th century until he was recently rediscovered in a small river in Thailand. He has come to us to share the best association insight that can be found on the web. Each week he shall select 3-5 articles that prove most useful to association professionals all around the world. Here is what Winston has to say about this week’s articles:

 

1. “Our first article this week comes from a white paper released in May of 2015. ‘Leading Engagement From The Outside In: Become an Indispensable Partner in Your Members’ Success’ is a must read for all association executives. It challenges typical engagement strategies focusing on what association executives value, not members. By turning engagement on its head, Caraveli and Engel are able to give associations new ways to think about engaging their members.” Read this whitepaper here

2. “Another great read this week was an Associations Now article about hiring leaders from within and outside of your organization. It seems as though every association grapples with this tough question. On one hand you have the person who knows the ins and outs of how the association runs and on the other you have a fresh set of eyes and a higher level of understanding of management. Has your association faced a similar dilemma? We’d love to hear about it” Read the article here

3. “Last but certainly not least was an article by Adrian Segar about we are all wasting time being perfect. He introduces the idea of “risky learning”, or ‘[trying] new things with the certainty that we will learn something different, perhaps something important that we would not have learned via a “safe” process, and [being] prepared for the possibility to “fail” in ways that teach us something new and fresh about our process.’ He gives a very interesting perspective that you can bring back to your association!” Check out the piece here

 

If you have any articles that you think Winston may not have seen feel free to email his assistant, Erik, at erikh@ewald.com. They’ll be sure to review your article and share it with the world!

Tags:  articles  association management  associations  marketing  Winston 

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The Importance of Mentorship

Posted By Kate-Madonna Hindes, Tuesday, April 14, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, April 14, 2015


 

My whole life I’ve tried to look beyond athletes or individuals who choose to advance their career, illegally. The same applies to business executives who have committed fraud or personally benefited from unethical transactions. It’s hard to see how anyone who plays by the rules can succeed in such a cutthroat world. When trying to analyze areas in my professional life where I’ve found success, I was surprised when I found the key to success sitting in my own lap! Mentorship is the one true practice that will ensure success in your business.

 

The importance of mentorship between a superior and a new employee is often overlooked in the business world. Companies hire new employees expecting them to sit through a day of "(Insert Company Name Here) Crash Course” and hit the ground running the next day. It simply doesn’t work like that. A relationship between mentor and mentee can be one of the most successful ways to ensure an employee is performing to the best of their abilities throughout their transition into a role.

 

This relationship is not only very beneficial for the new employee, but also the business. The potential benefits of the mentor, mentee, and company are quite impressive. Here are just a few of the benefits.

 

Mentee

1.      Increased Knowledge- The more knowledge that can be shared about the company, the ins and outs of the position, and each individual’s preferences, the more effective the new employee will be in his or her position.

2.      Networking- The new employee should be given the chance to meet everyone in the office. Not only will introducing them to coworkers make them feel like they belong, it will also give them the perception of promotion, positively impacting their work ethic.

3.      Comfort- By creating a relationship that extends beyond the professional lives of a superior and a newbie, the newcomer will be willing to reach out for help in a lot of scenarios that he or she potentially wouldn’t in normal circumstances.

 

Mentor

4.      Becoming a Teacher 101- Although they most likely didn’t go to school to learn how to teach, every management role requires one to be a professor of their branch and industry. Having a mentorship will help you more effectively and efficiently train in mew employees.

5.      Breaking Bad Habits- Where would your company be if management held every single employee "best practice” that they learned 20 years ago dear to heart? By training in new employees with the shiny company policies, management will be more likely to review how they go about their daily work, tidying up some areas they’ve become more lax about.

 

Company

6.      Employee Retention- Employees like companies who invest in them. By instilling confidence in the new employee and showing that your company cares about their success, they are much more likely to remain part of your team.

7.      Comprehensive Training- While some new employee training programs claim to be intensive and all encompassing, no one week training crash course will be as effective as a training program that keeps checking in on itself week after week. This relationship will allow you to curve employee performance continually as they grow within the company.

8.      Motivated Employees- This relationship will allow the new employee to find a niche within the company and get them more excited about their role. This will create a vested interest in the company’s success. Sparking this enthusiasm will create an employee base that comes to work smiling instead of one that punches in grumbling about how full their plate it.  

 

There are many other benefits that are less tangible and often small enough to dive under the radar when thinking about the benefits of mentorship. Implementing a solid mentorship program within your business will ensure success for the mentee, mentor, and the company as a whole. 

 

 

This post was written by Erik Hillesheim, Research Associate at Ewald Consulting. Reach Erik at ErikH@ewald.com. 

 

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Tags:  engaging millennials  marketing 

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The Biggest Thing I’ve Learned in Marketing

Posted By Sai Yang, Wednesday, March 11, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, March 10, 2015
Untitled Document

I’ve been working with Ewald Consulting for almost three months as a Digital Marketing Specialist. I’ve learned many lessons about marketing and content development. I feel very blessed with what I’ve already experienced and know there’s even more to come.

I’ve recently started writing down a lessoned learned each day. Sometimes they’re really small (like, sleep more) and sometimes they’re larger.

One important lesson I’m learning is:

keep it simple

I’m sure you’ve heard of the saying, “less is more.” When putting together content for social media such as Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn, you’ll want to make it simple. Consider what your audience needs and consider your purpose with every post.

I started noticing that there was more engagements and interactions, once I began putting fresh content on our social media. For example, if someone wrote a blog post for our website, I shared it on social media. I learned to add new, relevant content for social media- simply because it increased our engagement. And, believe it or not- simple was best. People enjoyed our posts about the team and internal workings of Ewald Consultant most!  

Remember:  When developing content for social media choose your words wisely. When you start to write a lot on a single post, you can lose your audience’s attention. Therefore, you’ll want to put the most important caption at the beginning and make it simple by giving less. I know, that’s one thing I learned!

Tags:  ewald consulting  keep it simple  lessons  marketing  sai yang 

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Quick and Easy Marketing Moves to Boost Conference Attendance

Posted By Julie Cygan, Tuesday, September 2, 2014
Untitled Document

Conference season is upon us and organizations are in various stages of marketing their events to build awareness, solicit exhibitors and sponsors, and, most importantly, ensure strong attendance. Strong attendance is the most critical of these activities. People want to attend an event that is successful — and attendance is a very visual, quantifiable measure of success. They see the conference as an opportunity to network and exchange ideas… so more attendees means more opportunities to connect. Sponsors and exhibitors are primarily interested in maximizing their exposure to decision-makers in the field and the value they perceive through conference sponsor/exhibitor opportunities is directly related to event attendance. Additionally, media contacts and stakeholder groups the organization hopes to influence will be more inclined to give attention to the organization if they know that its conference is a strong industry forum.

The following five moves can help give your conference an extra attendance boost.

  1. Send a special invitation to members who have never attended a conference before. This can be particularly impactful if the letter comes from an organizational leader like the board president or someone who has a direct relationship with the member. Even if a member is not able to attend the event this year, you will still gain some insight into why, which could result in changes for future years.
  2. Reach out to all new members who have joined in the last year. Again, this can be an invitation from a volunteer leader. Many organizations have an “ambassador” assigned to orient new members for the first year, which provides a natural fit for this. New members likely are not aware of the full value that is available through the conference experience, so a personal outreach effort to discuss this could be just what is needed to pull in a few more member attendees. You can bet that when the first-year member receives his/her dues renewal s/he will remember this invitation.
  3. Engage members, fans, and followers through social media. Most organizations find that they have a whole group of professionals who are loosely affiliated through social media but have never been contacted directly by an individual of the organization to ask them to engage further. The conference is the perfect opportunity for these individuals to convert their online interest into in-person networking. Make an effort to connect one-on-one through social media with people who haven’t engaged through another forum; you may be surprised at the responsiveness.
  4. Cross-promote with companies and organizations that support your membership. Many sponsors and exhibitors overlook the very easy promotional value they can gain by simply contacting their current and potential customers to encourage them to attend the conference and visit them while they’re there.
  5. Offer an incentive to those who help build attendance. This can be as simple as recognizing event promoters online or at the conference. It can be as involved as providing financial credit toward membership dues, event registration, advertising, or even cash back. An incentive-based campaign that recognizes successful attendee recruitment can generate new attendees, new members, and grow the overall organization.

While each of these moves is intended to boost conference attendance, they have the added bonus of giving the organization an excuse to contact and be front-of-mind with members and/or important industry supporters. This outreach may result in collateral benefits to the organization such as increased member retention and engagement by members and supporters in other activities of the organization. The impact that can result from a few little extra marketing steps can be significant and make the conference attendee experience all the more enriching.

Tags:  attendance  conference  event planning  ewald consulting  julie cygan  marketing 

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KNOWLEDGE & RESOURCES

MANAGEMENT | View all Management articles
A Successful Year Starts with a Solid Budget by Bill Monn
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MARKETING | View all Marketing articles
9 Marketing Ideas for Your Organization by Kathie Pugaczewski
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MEMBERSHIP | View all Membership articles
A Holistic Approach to Membership Recruitment by Darrin Hubbard
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VOLUNTEERISM | View all Volunteerism articles
Three Ways to Stronger Volunteer Engagement by Paul Hanscom
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